5 Safe Ways to Detox this Summer

Detoxing was once only known as a medical procedure to rid the body of dangerous, often life-threatening, levels of alcohol, drugs, or poisons.

Over the years, this term has been touted as a way to rid the body from toxins that cause symptoms from headaches to joint pain to depression.

The truth is, a detox lacks essential nutrients, such as proteins and fatty acids to keep our body healthy. In a healthy body, the skin, kidneys, lymphatic system, gastrointestinal system, and most importantly, the liver make up an astoundingly complex and sophisticated detoxification system.

Our lungs detoxify by removing gases, skin provides a barrier to protect us from outside substances, the colon detoxifies by eliminating waste from our bodies, kidneys filter toxins out of the blood into the urine and the liver detoxifies by filtering blood as well as secreting bile for digestion.

Here are 5 Safe Ways to Detox this Summer

1) Cut Back on Alcohol

In 2018, researchers found that 40 percent of American adults consume excessive amounts of alcohol. Ethanol has been identified as a known carcinogenic and can increase the risk of cancers in the mouth, liver, and breast.

Depending on who you are, drinking alcohol, moderately and responsibly, can lower cardiovascular risk

2) Eat More Fruits and Vegetables

Fruits and vegetables provide dietary fiber to help maintain bowel regularity. Fiber is even found in nuts, seeds, and whole grains. A variety of these foods support the body’s natural detoxification.

3) Unplug

It’s so easy to get wrapped up in the instant gratification literally at our fingertips. We have the ability to order items and have them delivered within hours. We mindlessly scrolling through feeds without realizing how much time has passed. You CAN detox simply by putting down the phone and connecting with the people around you. Unplug for an hour or even an entire day, if you can. 

4) Move Your Body 

You don’t need to pick up a rigorous plan. Ride your bike, walk in the park, go for a swim. In reality, the best physical activity is one you enjoy, but also the one you can easily fit into your daily schedule.

5) Get your ZZZ

Sleep deprivation has been linked to weight gain in adults and children. Children as young as 4 years old can have adverse effects from lack of sleep. A 2013 study published in Science, showed that during sleep the glymphatic system lets fluid flow rapidly through the brain. The glymphatic system helps control the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a clear liquid surrounding the brain and spinal cord. The glymphatic acts as a “flushing system” to remove toxins, which appears to be the most active during hours of sleep.

 

If you have questions about how you can better support your body’s detoxification, contact our dietitians at Banister Nutrition. We can provide personalized nutrition counseling to meet your lifestyle, preferences and health-related needs.

 

Xie et al “Sleep initiated fluid flux drives metabolite clearance from the adult brain.” Science, October 18, 2013. DOI: 10.1126/science.1241224

Low FODMAP Roasted Carrots with Almond Maple Drizzle

low fodmap roasted carrots

We’re always inspired by fellow IBS dietitians. Kate Scalara, RD is one of our favorites. Today, we are sharing another recipe inspired by her. Not only is this recipe low FODMAP, it’s also delicious and nutritious!

Carrots are rich in Vitamin A, beta-carotene and have 2 grams of fiber.

Another bonus: Carrots have no detectable FODMAPs!

Lactose-free yogurt can be substituted for Greek yogurt in this recipe.

Low FODMAP Roasted Carrots with Almond Maple Drizzle

What you Need:

  • 1 lb. multi-color carrots (small to medium size, we found these at Sprouts off MacArthur and 122nd)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Maple Drizzle:

  • 1 tablespoon plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon creamy almond butter
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons sliced almonds (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped kale or parsley (optional)

What to Do:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Line baking sheet with parchment paper. Toss carrots in olive oil and spread on a baking sheet. Salt and pepper carrots, to taste. Roast in the oven for 20-25 minutes until fork tender, turning halfway during roasting time.

In a small bowl, stir together yogurt, almond butter, and maple syrup until creamy. When carrots are done, spread maple mixture over the middle of the carrots. Garnish with sliced almonds and kale.

Enjoy!

LN

Low FODMAP Icebox Lemon Blueberry Tart

flat lay icebox lemon tart

 

You can still enjoy the sweet (and sour) of life on a Low FODMAP Diet. Today, we want to share an adaptation to one of our favorite IBS and FODMAP dietitian’s, Kate Scarlata. Here’s our Low FODMAP Icebox Lemon Blueberry Tart.

What you need:

  • 1/2 cup butter, room temperature
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 1 cup gluten-free oat flour + 1/3 cup fine ground cornmeal, mixed with a fork
  • 1/3 cup Trader Joe’s lemon curd
  • 8 ounces lactose-free cream cheese, softened
  • 1/2 cup fresh or frozen blueberries
  • Fresh mint (optional)

 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly oil and flour 10-inch tart pan. Using a mixer, cream together butter and sugar. Add egg yolks, mix to blend.

In 1/3 increments, mix in dry ingredients (mixture will become thick and sticky). Press mixture into the bottom of the tart pan. Bake tart for 20-25 minutes until golden brown and the middle is set. Remove the tart and allow to cool. In a small bowl, cream together cream cheese and lemon curd until evenly creamy. When the tart is cooled, spread cream cheese mixture on top of tart allowing a little edge of crust to remain uncovered. Garnish with blueberries and mint. Store in refrigerator until ready to serve.

    What is The Low FODMAP Diet?

    This week, our focus is the Low FODMAP Diet.

    FODMAP stands for:

    Fermentable

    Oligosaccharides,

    Disaccharides,

    Monosaccharides,

    And

    Polyols   

    FODMAPs are a group of fermentable carbohydrates that can cause severe aggravation such as stomach cramps,  gas and bloating, reflux, flatulence and bowel urgency, in people with IBS.

    FODMAPs are prebiotics and found in a large range of foods. Prebiotics supports the growth of good gut bacteria. Because of this, UNLESS you have been diagnosed with IBS, the Low FODMAP Diet is not advisable without talking to your dietitian.

    The Low FODMAP Diet has dramatically improved GI symptoms in many people with IBS.

    If you have IBS and would like to know more about how The Low FODMAP Diet may work for you, contact Banister Nutrition. Our dietitians can get you back on track of enjoying foods again.

    KD

    Hill, P., Muir, J. G., & Gibson, P. R. (2017). Controversies and Recent Developments of the Low-FODMAP Diet. Gastroenterology & hepatology13(1), 36–45.

    Managing Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Irritable bowel syndrome(IBS) is not a disease; it is a group of symptoms that occur together that affect the large intestine. One in five Americans and twice as many women as men experience symptoms of IBS. Though no specific cause is known, several factors may contribute to IBS, including heredity, lifestyle, allergies, an infection or an abnormally large number of bacteria growing in the intestine.
    The best way to manage IBS is to understand what may cause episodes of discomfort and then work to eliminate or minimize them. While medication, stress management and supplements can help, the focus should be on diet and eating habits.
    • Establish Regular Eating Habits. Eating at regular times helps regulate your bowels.
    • Eat Small, Frequent Meals Instead of Large Ones. This will ease the amount of food moving through your intestinal tract.
    • Eat Fiber-Rich Foods. Try whole fruits, vegetables (including beans) and whole grains like rolled oats, brown rice and whole-wheat bread. Make changes slowly. Fiber helps move food through your intestine, but it takes time for your body to adjust to eating more. Adding too much fiber too quickly may result in gas, bloating and cramping.
    • Drink Enough Fluids. Fiber draws water from your body to move foods through your intestine. Without enough water and fluids you may become constipated.
    • Watch What You Drink. Alcohol and caffeine can stimulate your intestines and cause diarrhea. Artificial sweeteners that contain sugar alcohols like sorbitol, mannitol and xylitol may cause diarrhea too. Carbonated drinks can produce gas.
    • Identify Problem Foods and Eating Habits. Keeping a food diary during flare-ups can help you figure out what you may be eating that’s causing a problem.
    Although the focus should be on diet, many people with IBS turn to complementary health practices to help relieve their symptoms, and there is emerging evidence that some of these practices may have modest benefits.
    If you are thinking about a complementary health practice for IBS, here’s what you need to know:
    • Herbal remedies. Herbal remedies are commonly used for IBS symptoms; however, much of the research on these remedies has been done in China. A review of clinical trials for 71 herbal remedies found limited evidence suggesting that a few of these herbal remedies might help improve IBS symptoms including abdominal pain, constipation, and diarrhea. However, the review emphasizes that the studies were generally of poor quality.
    • Peppermint oil. Peppermint oil is one herbal remedy often used to treat IBS for which there are mixed results. There is some evidence that enteric-coated peppermint oil capsules may be modestly effective in reducing several common symptoms of IBS—especially abdominal pain, bloating, and gas. Non-enteric coated forms of peppermint oil may cause or worsen heartburn symptoms, but otherwise appear to be generally safe.
    • Probiotics. Probiotics such as Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus are live microorganisms that are similar to microorganisms normally found in the human digestive tract, and they have been associated with an improvement in IBS symptoms compared with placebo. Results of studies suggest probiotics may decrease some patients’ abdominal pain, bloating, and gas.
    • Acupuncture. While a few small studies have indicated that acupuncture has some positive effect on quality of life in people with IBS, reviews of the scientific literature have concluded that there is no convincing evidence to support the use of acupuncture for the treatment of IBS symptoms.
    Tell all your health care providers about any complementary health practices you use. Give them a full picture of what you do to manage your health. This will help ensure coordinated and safe care.
    To learn more about managing symptoms of IBS, consult your doctor and a registered dietitian. sls

    The GOOD Bacteria- PROBIOTICS

     More than 400 types of microorganisms are in your gastrointestinal tract. Some of these microorganisms are healthy and others are unhealthy. The healthy bacteria in your gut help digest food. They also synthesize some vitamins and essential fatty acids.

    Probiotics are live microbes that can benefit your health by allowing the healthy bacteria in your gastrointestinal (GI) tract to thrive while inhibiting or destroying toxins released by other bacteria.

    Benefits of probiotics
    Scientists still are learning how and why probiotics work. Some of the potential benefits include:

    • Synthesizing vitamins (particularly the B vitamins)
    • Boosting your immune system by producing antibodies for certain viruses
    • Decreasing allergies (particularly in regard to skin reactions, such as dermatitis or eczema)
    • Decreasing the risk of developing dental caries
    • Reducing the problems associated with inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome
    • Helping people with lactose intolerance digest dairy products more easily
    • Reducing symptoms of diarrhea associated with antibiotic usage or acute illness

    Foods containing probiotics
    Pasteurization kills probiotics, but many fermented-food manufacturers add them back into the food. Fermented foods and dairy products are the two most common sources. Strict labeling guidelines do not exist for probiotic-containing foods at this time. The dose needed for probiotics varies widely, depended on type and formulation.
    The following foods contain probiotics:

    • Yogurt
    • Cottage cheese
    • Buttermilk
    • Kefir
    • Soy sauce
    • Miso
    • Tempeh
    • Fresh sauerkraut

    Benefits of prebiotics
    Prebiotics are nondigestible substances that feed the probiotics, helping them to thrive in the GI tract. Not all probiotics consumed will survive, so it is important to consume prebiotics with probiotics.

    • Prebiotics enhance mineral absorption, particularly calcium, iron, and magnesium, possibly decreasing the risk of osteoporosis development and decreased survival of some pathogenic bacteria
    • Prebiotics may decrease cholesterol levels and also reduce the risk of colon cancer.
    • Some forms of prebiotics aid in the relief of constipation
    • Different strains of prebiotics provide different health benefits

    Foods containing prebiotics

    • Chicory root
    • Jerusalem artichoke
    • Wheat
    • Barley
    • Rye
    • Flax
    • Oatmeal
    • Onion
    • Garlic
    • Leeks
    • Legumes
    • Asparagus
    • Leafy greens
    • Berries
    • Bananas
    • Honey

    If you have diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, lactose intolerance, constipation or just uncomfortable digestive symptoms- different strands of bacteria will be beneficial. A registered dietitian can help you find the right pre- and probiotic for you and your condition. sls

    Source: RD411.com, Retrieved 1/24/2013